Assessing the ecological functionality and integrity of natural ponds, excavated ponds and stormwater basins for conserving amphibian diversity

Authors: K L Smalling; Sara E Breitmeyer; John F Bunnell; Kim J Laidig; Patrick M Burritt; Marilyn C Sobel; Jonathan A Cohl; Michelle L Hladik; Kristin M Romanok; Paul M Bradley
Contribution Number: 792

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gecco.2021.e01765

Abstract/Summary

Wetlands provide ecological functionality by maintaining and promoting regional biodiversity supporting quality habitat for aquatic organisms. Globally, habitat loss, fragmentation and degradation due to increases in agricultural activities and urban development have reduced or altered geographically isolated wetlands, thus reducing biodiversity. The objective of this study was to assess the relative ecological function and integrity of natural ponds, excavated ponds and stormwater basins for amphibian diversity in the New Jersey Pinelands, USA by comparing hydrologic conditions, water quality, pesticide concentrations (water, sediment and tissue) and plant and anuran assemblages. Twenty-four wetlands were selected based on surrounding land-use and sampled for a variety of abiotic and biotic variables. Abiotic and biotic wetland variables were similar between natural and excavated ponds, with notable differences between the ponds and stormwater basins. Natural and excavated ponds displayed characteristic Pinelands water quality (low pH, high organic carbon, and low pesticide concentrations), exhibited high ecological integrity and supported native anuran species. Stormwater basins and degraded ponds surrounded by altered land-use exhibited degraded water quality (high pH, high pesticide concentrations) and were dominated by non-native and introduced plant and anuran species. Results from this study can broadly inform resource conservation strategies for amphibians and other communities with a diverse range of habitat requirements, particularly in areas where conservation and development are competing priorities. To conserve biodiversity in changing landscapes, wetlands with similar functionality and land-use characteristics need to be identified and managed to preserve water quality for species of conservation concern.

Publication details
Published Date: 2012-08-20
Outlet/Publisher: Global Ecology and Conservation 30, e01765
Media Format: URL

ARMI Organizational Units:
Northeast - Water
Topics:
Stressors; Water
Place Names:
New Jersey; New Jersey Pinelands
Keywords:
agriculture; amphibians; ARMI; biodiversity; call surveys; conservation; habitat; habitat alteration; habitat destruction; habitat effects; herbicides; hydroperiod; introduced species; land cover/land use; management; pesticides; pond-breeding amphibians; stressors; surface water; threatened species; water; water quality; wetlands; wildlife habitat
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