Climate Change

Freshwater wetlands provide critical habitat for a diverse array of organisms including many amphibians. Yet, under the continued impacts of water diversions and the newer threats of climate change, these habitats are among the most imperiled ecosystems on Earth. Climate change has the potential to alter many sources of water critical to the habitats amphibians need, especially those associated with breeding and development. Potential changes include: change in timing and availability of water from glacier melt, snow and rain timing and amount; persistence of vernal pools and seasonal wetlands; altered evapotranspiration rates; and reduced stream flows and groundwater recharge rates.

Other ecosystem components likely to change in response to climate change include the timing and frequency of fires, the spread of invasive plants and animals, and microclimates in which the animals live.

Ground-truthing.
Robert Fisher and Stacey Hathaway (ARMI) ground-truthing potential desert-frog breeding sites selected using remote sensing of soil characteristics derived from known breeding site. Photo by: C. Schwalbe.

Climate Change - ARMI Papers & Reports

Trend Data Occupancy estimates Monitoring winter breeding frogs and salamanders: Ambystoma talpoideum, Pseudacris ornata ( Mole Salamander, Ornate Chorus Frog)
Location: Panacea Unit ; St Marks NWR
Estimate extinction and colonization rates of pond breeding frogs and salamanders in relation to climate.
Trend Data Terrestrial Wetland Global Change Research Network (TWGCRN): Pseudacris crucifer ( Spring Peeper)
Location: Tamarac NWR, St. Croix National Scenic Riverway, North Temperate Lakes Long-term Ecological Resea... ; North America
Work with partners and collaborators across North America to describe baseline occupancy, diversity, and relative abundance and monitor and describe any changes in populations relative to changes in climate, land cover/use, human activities, hydrology, and disease using standard methods. Note: Research locations at the TNWR, SCNSR, NTLLTER, and UMR also are research nodes in the TWGCRN.
Trend Data Occupancy estimates Upper Mississippi River (UMR): Pseudacris crucifer ( Spring Peeper)
Location: . ; Upper Mississippi River
Describe baseline occupancy, diversity, and relative abundance. Monitor and describe any changes in populations relative to changes in climate, land cover/use, human activities, hydrology, and disease.
View All Papers & Reports on Climate Change

View All Data Releases on Climate Change
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